Julianne Thomson’s Spin Exhibition at Yale-NUS College

Julianne Thomson artist Yale-NUS College Singapore
Julianne Thomson’s The Leanover

As an art student, how do you navigate the perennial tension between the ‘rules’ you are taught and the thing that drew you to art in the first place—the ability to express yourself creatively? For that matter, how does any student navigate the tension, learning from the past without mindlessly and slavishly copying?

Julianne Thomson is a final-year art student at Yale-NUS College, and Spin is a body of work she produced for her ‘capstone’ project, the last work all seniors complete before graduating. If there is ever a time when those tensions between individual creative freedom and the strictures of an educational environment come to the fore, this is it. Yet what makes Julianne’s work fascinating is the self-consciousness with which she broke the artistic ‘rules’ she was taught—she subtly pushes the rules and eventually breaks them, but all the while does so knowingly and overtly. This is much more nuanced than youthfully railing against your professors’ strictures. It is at once a nod to the professors and a nod to the students, a foot in both camps. 

Spin was conceived from the depths of autobiography—a tragedy at a beach in Indonesia involving a close friend—but no autobiography is needed to approach these works. The Leanover (2017-18) is the star of the show. Moving fluidly between abstraction and representation—you see a face one minute, nothing but swirls of colour the next, and a body a minute later—this work is a statement of colour and texture. A background pushes forward against the flowing, emerald-like lines of blue, but then seems to draw back again. Yellow, red and blue dominate the canvas but are applied in such a way that they still appear wet and liquidy, drips flowing from top to bottom, and ‘waves’ moving laterally. Part of this is to do with the ‘rules’ Julianne is breaking by applying acrylic (‘lean’) over oil, which helps her gain such a marbling effect: technically, art students are taught the ‘fat-over-lean’ rule where acrylic should always be applied under oil for the sake of the longevity of the work. Breaking the rules were necessary for the watery effect Julianne needed: the art student moves from student to artist. 

Blue Spin is a more gestural and emotional work than The Leanover, colours less gentle and brushstrokes stronger. Again a sense of liquid is overwhelming, the swirls, shapes and textures emphasising the fluidity of the paint. But then you see it: bottom-right, a vertical slice through the canvas. This is no Lucio Fontana-like meditation on the nature of space and the canvas, however: this is a mark of aggression and pain, not the studio-conceived minimalism of Fontana’s works. Near the puncture in the canvas one can still make out the marks of Julianne’s feet which stood on this canvas, stomped on it, in frustration. This painting bears some of the pain from which it was conceived, for those who look carefully.

A year is not all that long with which to produce your first complete body of work—the first time, too, that you have to hang your own gallery space, with all the decisions and logistics that involves—and there is an expected unevenness to the exhibition. Some works, like The Thick, the largest canvas in the exhibiton—a low-hung, horizontal banner—are as individual works still needing resolution. We can still see the process and the struggle taking place before time ran out and the works needed to be hung. But to find anything else would have been disappointing: this is the very beginning of an artistic journey, the somewhere-between-primordial-and-emerging marks of the early stages of an artistic career. In this context, the visible search for resolution in some works is a reminder of how much more there is to come, ultimately with the more general resolution, polish and power of The Leanover.

Walking around Spin I had the overwhelming impression of liquid and water both as subject and form—liquid as in a sense what these works are about, but also liquid as what enabled these works. From the emerald-blue marbling in The Leanover, to the repetitions of wave-like forms horizontally in The Thick, to the sense of looking through a layer of liquid in Over The Archipelago, it is fluid and water that seems to wash over the room. Fluid kills, and it gives life: remember the pain in Blue Spin, but the sense of joy some of these paintings give. So as you then walk out of the exhibition and see the pond at the heart of Yale-NUS College’s campus, and as you join the stream of people flowing around, this meditation on liquids and surfaces seems all the more pertinent.

Spin is the exhibition one hopes for from an art student about to become simply artist. Its reflections and its lessons on learning as a student and knowing when to move beyond your lessons are ones relevant to all of us in such a context—and they are, when looking around the exhibition one last time and glimpsing The Leanover, inspiring.

Julianne Thomson Spin Yale-NUS College The Leanover

Julianne Thomson’s Blue Spin, left foreground.